Author Archives: Craig Jahnke

About Craig Jahnke

Craig Jahnke is a Technical Architect at Concurrency who helps clients develop their strategies for implementing SharePoint and Office 365 solutions that enable their employees to effectively and securely share information and data across their organizations. He speaks at user groups, organizes SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs, and loves to talk with others about technology and how to use it to solve business problems.

3 Hidden Costs of Going to the Cloud

It seems like everyone one is going to the Cloud these days.  It makes a lot of sense for a lot of reasons:

  • Shifts the costs of running your own data center and having to maintain hardware
  • More secure – best of the best are running and monitoring
  • Scalability – Use only the power you need when you need it
  • Automatically upgraded systems pushed out by the Cloud Providers
  • More features and options than you can do yourself

Those are just some of the reasons to go to the Cloud, but if your not careful going to the Cloud can be more expensive than you think for numerous reasons.  Here are 3 reasons that a lot companies don’t think about:

  1. Migration Costs – Getting to the Cloud costs time and money.  The planning process itself can take month to years depending on what you are trying to move.  If you are using the Cloud for app development, it is easier than if you are moving file shares or Collaboration environments like SharePoint to Office 365.  From planning comes running the migration jobs, monitoring, and remediation.  All take time and money.
  2. Mismanagement of Resources – Everything in the Cloud costs money: storage, processing power, data streaming, using services, etc.  In efficient code or leaving test environments running when not in use are slow drains on your system that quickly add up to big money.  Also failing to manage users who leave your organization is just trowing money away to user based subscriptions models like Salesforce or Office 365.
  3. Change Management – Businesses under estimate the cost of re-educating and re-training users on the new system.  It costs time and money to create training materials, train users, and get them up to speed quickly.  Loss of productivity can be experienced during the transition and should be planned for.

These are just a few of the way reasons companies don’t see as much ROI on their Cloud investments as they would like.  The good news is with proper planning, budgeting, and monitoring, these drains on ROI can be minimized and companies can make the most of transitioning to the Cloud

Private Microsoft Teams in Office 365 to become NOT so Private

So this showed up in my inbox today… News flash I am one of the organizers of SharePoint Saturday Chicago Suburbs, our next event is May 5th.  <— Shameless plug 🙂

Organization: SPS CHICAGO SUBURBS
We’re making it easier to share and join private teams in Microsoft Teams
Major update: General Availability rollout started
Applied to: All customers

Starting March 23, 2018, private teams will be searchable in Microsoft Teams. This feature update will make it easier for people to share and join Teams.[How does this affect me?]Until now, it was not possible for users to find and request access to a private team in the Teams app. Users had to either be invited to a team or search for the underlying group in Outlook in the Outlook app.Now, private teams will be discoverable via search and the Suggested teams gallery, making it easier to share and discover private teams across an organization. If a user requests to join a private team, the team owner will receive a notification and can approve or deny the request directly in Teams. [What do I need to do to prepare for this change?]We recommend that you inform team owners about this change. If team names or descriptions include sensitive information, team owners may want to update them before this change occurs on March 23, 2018.If you wish to hide a private team or group, Office 365 admins can use the Set-UnifiedGroup PowerShell cmdlet to hide specific groups or teams (in Outlook, Outlook Web App, and Microsoft Teams). Specifically, use the HiddenFromAddressListsEnabled parameter, which you can apply to individual groups. For further instructions, please click Additional Information below.

I get Microsoft wants to be more collaborative,  I think this is an interesting move.  People create private groups for a reason, they want them to be private.  While I think it is great that they recommend Team owners change the names of their Teams if they contain sensitive information, I think there will be more than one Team owner who doesn’t read the “memo” (ok I’m old) and not be happy about it.  At least they give PowerShell commands for hiding them, but that seems to put more work on the Administrators.

I would like to see this rolled out as an opt-in type of feature that organizations could decide to “turn on” or not, rather than be rolled out as “turned on” already.  I would recommend Admins start running reports and to see if they have any Teams names with sensitive information, or any questionable names for that matter.

A copy of this blog was posted on my podcast site that I do with Jay Leask:  https://www.onthespot.tech/2018/02/28/private-microsoft-teams-in-office-365-to-become-not-so-private/

Hope this helps!

Craig

 

 

Introduction to Security and Compliance in the Cloud Series

I have recently begun recording a podcast with one of my friends/co-workers called :

On the SPOT – The SPeed Of Technology podcast

We published the latest edition yesterday. 🙂 Below is the synopsis of the cast. Hope you enjoy it!

In today’s On the SPOT News Brief, Jay Leask and Craig Jahnke introduce a new series of upcoming episodes around Security and Compliance in the Cloud. We know the cloud offers the combined resources and finances of hundreds of thousands of organizations, but why does that give it a chance to be more secure than your on premises infrastructure? And what considerations do you need to keep in mind when you plan your move? In the coming weeks we will dig into each of the topics discussed today.

ARTICLES FOR THIS WEEK

Cloud Workloads at Risk [Beta News]

Security, Management, and Compliance Challenges are Impacting Cloud Benefits [Help Net Security]

  • An average 50 percent of their infrastructure on cloud systems.
  • 58 percent say security is their top concern, followed by protecting sensitive data from unauthorized access (55 percent) and the increased complexity of infrastructure (44 percent).
  • Only 39 percent consider themselves ultimately responsible for the compliance of data stored on cloud services
  • A worrying 20 percent believe it’s solely the responsibility of the cloud service provider.
  • Only 25 percent of respondents have automated tools in place to ensure compliance rules are not broken.
  • 39% reported their infrastructure was more complex since using the cloud, and 53% spend more time on management tasks than they have done previously

Move Feature in SharePoint, Office 365, and OneDrive for Business

A new ‘Move’ feature will allow users to freely move content anywhere in Office 365, SharePoint and OneDrive for Business. To end users, this will offer greater freedom than the previously released ‘copy’ feature.

With Move, documents and other files can move with full fidelity across the platform while maintaining version history and metadata.

The everyday SharePoint and Office 365 user can benefit from this new feature in a few ways.

For me, I like to first spin up a rough draft for a project in OneDrive.  With the Move feature, I can then move it to a Teams site when I’m ready to share it with my team. Then, if we decide we want to publish the document, we might move it to a SharePoint site so that is accessible to the whole company.   The whole time the document keeps its metadata and version history intact!

Move feature in SharePoint. Office 365 and OneDrive for Business

A New Feature for the New World of Collaboration

Prior to the Move feature, I would have to rely on Copy – or even copy and paste – to move document. This may serve your needs, but the move feature offers a richer move. It brings over version history and some metadata that copying does not.

This new feature can save teams a lot of time when it comes to everyday documents – editing, approving, etc. It’s probably not the best route when it comes to moving sensitive documents. If your environment has record retention policies in place for documents, for example, it makes a copy rather than just moving the document. The original document doesn’t leave the records center, but moves a copy.

With this new feature, however, there are some things to consider regarding governance. Currently, users would not receive a report saying that employee ‘X’ moved a document to from library ‘Y’ to library ‘Z.’

If employee ‘X’ leaves the organization, others on the team are not aware that the item has moved. These items may not be where the rest of the team expects it to be when they go looking for them.

What the Move feature means for the Everyday User

For me, as a strategic advisor, the ability to move items and see their histories is very helpful. I do a lot of statements of work and proposals for clients. Those change over time as we go back and forth.

I usually start those out in OneDrive for Business because I need to have a rough draft and I don’t want extra clutter. Once I get it to a point where I’m relatively pleased with it, I’ll move it to our pursuit document library in our operations site. Now, I can see what changes have been made and I can make new changes accordingly.

The real benefits of this feature come when managing documents that frequently change over time and may need to be moved. It can also be a big help when it comes to company reorgs. Here at AvePoint, we recently reorganized our HR department. Our HR department changed to our People department. We could now use this feature to move over some prudent documents while leaving others behind.

I wouldn’t call this feature a gamechanger, but it’s undoubtedly a helpful tool. It helps eliminate clutter, enhances transparency and works towards making your SharePoint as agile and efficient as it can be. Less copies of documents means redundancies and helps establish a single source of truth.

What is the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR)?

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) imposes new rules on organizations that offer goods and services to people in the European Union (EU), or that collect and analyze data tied to EU residents, no matter where they are located.  Most people in the US don’t know or don’t think this affects them, but he key phrase is “no matter where they are located” is what US business should be worried about.  It means if you offer a service in Europe or just have a website that people in Europe can access and provide information, this may affect you too.

There are 4 key components of the GDPR:

  1. Enhanced personal privacy rights – Consent must be clear and distinguishable from other matters and provided in an intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language. It must be as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give it.​Part of the expanded rights is the right for data subjects to obtain from the data controller confirmation as to whether or not personal data concerning them is being processed, where and for what purpose.  Also Data Erasure entitles the data subject to have the data controller erase his/her personal data, cease further dissemination of the data, and potentially have third parties halt processing of the data.
  2. Increased duty for protecting data – Privacy by design is becoming part of a legal requirement with the GDPR.  Privacy by design calls for the inclusion of data protection from the onset of the designing of systems.
  3. Mandatory breach reporting – Breach notification will become mandatory in all member states where a data breach is likely to “result in a risk for the rights and freedoms of individuals”. This must be done within 72 hours of first having become aware of the breach.
  4. Significant penalties for non-compliance – Organizations can be fined up to 4% of annual global turnover for breaching GDPR or €20 Million.

To get the full details of the GDPR, visit this link: https://www.eugdpr.org/eugdpr.org.html

 

Accessing SharePoint Online List Settings

I hadn’t had to do a lot of SharePoint Online things for a few month, but I needed to create a list and I wanted to add a Site Column  to it.  With the new List feature in SPO, I couldn’t find the List Settings.  There used to have a Ribbon across the top of the page to access everything, but it has been removed.  I know this was news a few weeks ago or months, but I wasn’t really paying attention.

I tried clicking the + and the More… link in the list column header…

ListMore

But that just took me to the Create Column page.  That would only allow me to create a column, not use a Site Column.   😦

CreateColumn

 

It took me longer than I should admit, but I finally found it.  The List settings link was moved to the Cog in the upper right hand corner…

 

ListSettingsCog

From there I was in familiar territory and could add my site column. 🙂

addexistingsiteColumn

I hope this helps!

Craig

On The SPOT Podcast – Episode #2

I am excited to announce the release “On The SPOT Podcast – Episode #2”  – On The SPOT Podcast with Dux Raymond Sy. Please check it out and let us know what you think!

podcast-logo

In this episode, Jay Leask and I provided a bit more detail about themselves and kicked off our show with talk about Microsoft’s partner conference – Inspire, some news around Google Glass, Elon Musk, the Verizon hack, and much much more.  Our guest Dux Raymond Sy, Chief Marketing Officer and Public Sector CTO of AvePoint, Inc t  joined the conversation to tell us about his experience at Inspire, the direction of Microsoft, #TechForGood, #ShiftHappens, and what the C-Suite is looking for in tech solutions.  We had a good time recording the show and hope you will enjoy listening to it!!!